Category Archives: auto-ui

Personal and Ubiquitous Computing theme issue: Automotive user interfaces and interactive applications in the car

I’m thrilled to announce that the theme issue of Personal and Ubiquitous Computing entitled “Automotive user interfaces and interactive applications in the car” is now available in PUC’s Online First. I had the pleasure of serving as co-editor of this theme issue with Albrecht Schmidt, Anind Dey, and Susanne Boll.

The theme issue includes our editorial [1], and three papers. The first is by Tuomo Kujala, who explores scrolling on touch screens  while driving [2]. The second is by Florian Schaub, Markus Hipp, Frank Kargl, and Michael Weber, who address the issue of credibility in the context of automotive navigation systems [3]. The third paper is co-authored by me, my former PhD student Alex Shyrokov, and Peter Heeman. We explore multi-threaded spoken dialogues between a driver and a remote conversant [4]. The three papers were selected in a rigorous review process from 17 submissions, by approximately 50 reviewers.

 

References

[1] Andrew L. Kun, Albrecht Schmidt, Anind Dey and Susanne Boll, “Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Applications in the Car,” PUC Online First

[2] Tuomo Kujala, “Browsing the Information Highway while Driving – Three In-Vehicle Touch Screen Scrolling Methods and Driver Distraction,” PUC Online First

[3] Florian Schaub, Markus Hipp, Frank Kargl, and Michael Weber, “On Credibility Improvements for Automotive Navigation Systems,” PUC Online First

[4] Andrew L. Kun, Alexander Shyrokov, and Peter A. Heeman, “Interactions between Human-Human Multi-Threaded Dialogues and Driving,” PUC Online First

2011 Cognitive Load and In-Vehicle Human-Machine Interaction workshop

I’m thrilled to announce the 2011 Cognitive Load and In-Vehicle Human-Machine Interaction workshop (CLW 2011) to be held at AutomotiveUI 2011 in Salzburg, Austria. I’m co-organizing the workshop with Peter Heeman, Tim Paek, Tom Miller, Paul Green, Ivan Tashev, Peter Froehlich, Bryan Reimer, Shamsi Iqbal and Dagmar Kern. 

Why have this workshop? Interactions with in-vehicle electronic devices can interfere with the primary task of driving. The concept of cognitive load helps us understand the extent to which these interactions interfere with the driving task and how this interference can be mitigated. While research results on in-vehicle cognitive load are frequently presented at automotive research conferences and in related journals, so far no dedicated forum is available for focused discussions on this topic. This workshop aims to fill that void.

Submissions to the workshop are due October 17. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

– Cognitive load estimation in the laboratory,
– Cognitive load estimation on the road,
– Sensing technologies for cognitive load estimation,
– Algorithms for cognitive load estimation,
– Performance measures of cognitive load,
– Physiological measures of cognitive load,
– Visual measures of cognitive load,
– Subjective measures of cognitive load,
– Methods for benchmarking cognitive load,
– Cognitive load of driving,
– Cognitive overload and cognitive underload,
– Approaches to cognitive load management inspired by human-human interactions.

For a detailed description of workshop goals take a look at the call for papers.